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Indian Girl

December 4, 2000

The Aubrey Band of 1906.  The photo was made in a building that was located at 101 S. Cherry Street.  The names of the Band Members are top row:  left to right, unknown man, Edd Coffee, Neal McNatt, R.P. Hollar, Jim Sims, Dan Griffey, Dan Lanford
Middle Row:  Hugh Crawford, Regan Looper, W.F. Gates
Bottom Row:  Earl Gates, Roland Peipelman, and Earnest Smith
The photo was made inside the old Aubrey Opera House as it once stood on the lot across from Bertha Mustain's home on Cherry Street.   The building faced the south and it was thought to be about thirty feet wide and sixty feet long of wood construction.  It was destroyed by fire when the town burned to the ground in 1909.  Notice the quality of fine photography that existed in 1906.

I am leaving the Civil War letters for this week and will resume soon; however, I would like to mention this week, Saturday morning, December 11, at 11:00 a.m., the Northern Town District Cherokees are meeting at Jackie’s Hardware. They will be finalizing plans for a POW WOW for the North Town and Southern Oklahoma. The POW WOW will be attended by several hundred in early 2001. So you local Cherokees come and help us. This will be a very adventurous meeting held by Chief Lillie Redbird, refreshments will be served.

The Census bureau listed the different tribes and customs of Native Americans during the 1847 period for the 1850 edition. According to the Indian population in Texas during that time, the bureau reported from their latest authorities a total estimated count of 29,575 with 5,915 warriors in that group.

Tribes of our local region show to be of the Wae-coes, Witchitas and the Tah-wae-conis, of which I would say that during that period of time and of those three tribes only about 1000 estimated Native Americans existed in this North Texas region. And of that 1000, the estimate concluded that 200 were warriors.

The historical recordings in the different reports by Governor Throckmorton during 1867, when Onega was in existence as I can account from old printed write-ups and photos conclude that the 1000 Indians in this region were probably fairly accurate, as the raiding Indians came down the Elm and Clear Creeks from the Indian Territory of Oklahoma and supplemented the population here for only a short while. Rev. George T. Key had several families in the Onega area to minister to with the Methodist group.

There were several known structures existing in Onega at that time; one structure that existed was the old Edwards’ mansion with the full basement. A log house with a 16 foot by 20 foot floor space and a nice wood level floor was used for a barn at the old Edwards’ mansion; however, it was the original home that the Edwards used for shelter when they first settled in Onega. The log house burned to the ground one night back in the 1970's.

The local natives were of the Tah-wae-conis tribe of our area and the population included some Ana-day-has of the Caddoes Associates. The interesting break down of the Indian population of Texas on the 1847 report showed the following:

Name of the Tribe

1846

1847

1849

1850

Warriors

Comanches-Na-v-ni

14,300

12,000

20,000

1,500

4,000

Kiowas

 

1,500

1,500

300

 

Lipans (Apache)

200

500

500

100

 

Caddoes

1,500

1,400

1,200

280

 

Ana-dah-has

 

 

 

 

 

Koechies

 

300

300

60

 

Wae-coes

 

 

 

 

 

Witchitas

300

1,000

1,000

200

 

Tah-wae-conis

 

 

 

 

 

Tonkahiras

75

650

500

130

 

Mus-ks-le-ras Apache

4,000

1,500

2,000

3,500

400

Euquatops Apache

 

 

 

 

 

Delawares

 

650

525

130

 

Creeks

 

50

50

10

 

Cherokees

 

25

25

5

 

 
   
 

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